Johnny Cash

In this study we read through Richard Beck’s book Trains, Jesus, and Murder – The Gospel According to Johnny Cash. The book grew out of a bible study Beck leads at a local maximum-security prison. In the book, Beck shows us how Cash, like Jesus, brings us into the presence of the marginalized and forgotten people of our society – the imprisoned, the heartbroken, the beaten down, Native Americans, common laborers, drug addicts and those who have never felt the love of Jesus. For the men that Cash sang to and about or the men that Beck leads in bible study, sin and its consequences and the promise of one-day being free are not theoretical ideas to be discussed, but an ever-present reality that is lived. In many ways, Cash’s songs are a psalmody for our time. This Epiphany Lesson covers seven weeks.

The Gospel According to Johnny Cash – Introduction

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1506433766/ref=as_li_qf_asin_il_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=ancientanglic-20&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=1506433766&linkId=a2fac401ec02ac57c7e6a7bba80effc4 For our (virtual) Epiphany study this year, we will be reading through the book Trains, Jesus, and Murder – The Gospel According to Johnny Cash. …
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San Quentin (Habakkuk 1)

Cash plays the role of the prophet. He sings about the dehumanization, brutality, and ultimate ineffectiveness of San Quentin Prison. His hatred for the institution …
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Ira Hayes (Exodus 22)

God is always found on the side of the oppressed, not because they are inherently better than the oppressor, but rather simply because they are …
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